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The Grapes of Wrath
by John Steinbeck

619 pages Reissue edition (October 1992)
Penguin USA (Paper); ISBN: 0140186409

When The Grapes of Wrath was published in 1939, America, still recovering from the Great Depression, came face to face with itself in a startling, lyrical way. John Steinbeck gathered the country's recent shames and devastations--the Hoovervilles, the desperate, dirty children, the dissolution of kin, the oppressive labor conditions--in the Joad family. Then he set them down on a westward-running road, local dialect and all, for the world to acknowledge. For this marvel of observation and perception, he won the Pulitzer in 1940.

The prize must have come, at least in part, because alongside the poverty and dispossession, Steinbeck chronicled the Joads' refusal, even inability, to let go of their faltering but unmistakable hold on human dignity. Witnessing their degeneration from Oklahoma farmers to a diminished band of migrant workers is nothing short of crushing. The Joads lose family members to death and cowardice as they go, and are challenged by everything from weather to the authorities to the California locals themselves. As Tom Joad puts it: "They're a-workin' away at our spirits. They're a tryin' to make us cringe an' crawl like a whipped bitch. They tryin' to break us. Why, Jesus Christ, Ma, they comes a time when the on'y way a fella can keep his decency is by takin' a sock at a cop. They're workin' on our decency."

The point, though, is that decency remains intact, if somewhat battle-scarred, and this, as much as the depression and the plight of the "Okies," is a part of American history. When the California of their dreams proves to be less than edenic, Ma tells Tom: "You got to have patience. Why, Tom--us people will go on livin' when all them people is gone. Why, Tom, we're the people that live. They ain't gonna wipe us out. Why, we're the people--we go on." It's almost as if she's talking about the very novel she inhabits, for Steinbeck's characters, more than most literary creations, do go on. They continue, now as much as ever, to illuminate and humanize an era for generations of readers who, thankfully, have no experiential point of reference for understanding the depression. The book's final, haunting image of Rose of Sharon--Rosasharn, as they call her--the eldest Joad daughter, forcing the milk intended for her stillborn baby onto a starving stranger, is a lesson on the grandest scale. "'You got to,'" she says, simply. And so do we all. --Melanie Rehak

articles and reviews

Steinbeck's 'Grapes,' With His Diary of Writing It

March 30, 1989
By CHRISTOPHER LEHMANN-HAUPT


On April 14, a half century will have passed since the original publication of John Steinbeck's masterpiece, ''The Grapes of Wrath.'' To celebrate the occasion, Viking Press is bringing out a new edition of the novel with an introduction by Studs Terkel, as well as ''Working Days,'' a diary kept by Steinbeck while he wrote his Depression epic of tenant farmers making their slow and painful way from the Oklahoma Dust Bowl to the migrant labor camps of California.

The occasion of the 50th Anniversary Edition is a happy one. It gives one a chance to reread the novel after many years and to discover how remarkably well it stands up. Tainted only by Steinbeck's tendency to describe his characters' virtues instead of dramatizing them, his somewhat shallow proselytizing for collective action and the ending in which Rose of Sharon offers the starving stranger her breast, which has always struck this reader as portentous and off-key, the book retains to an impressive degree its power to convey how the plight of the Dust Bowl migrants was the tragedy of an entire social class as well as that of the Joad family. [read more]

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